Banned Review: The Broken Duke (The 1797 Club #3) by Jess Michaels

Adelaide Longford is London’s most overlooked bluestocking wallflower and that is fine by her. Being ignored gives her the perfect opportunity to sneak out and secretly take on the persona of the most celebrated actress of the day, Lydia Ford. The thrill of walking the boards and hearing the applause of those who watch her is the most exciting experience of her life.

Until Graham Everly, Duke of Northfield comes into her life. He is broken after the humiliating loss of his longtime fiancé to his supposed best friend and they enter into a lusty affair which sets her body on fire. Graham has no idea why he’s so attracted to both the bespectacled, prickly Adelaide and the passionate Lydia, but soon he is caught in a dance with them both and torn between which future he wants to pursue.

When Graham finds out Adelaide’s secret identity will he be able to accept both parts of her? And will he be able to save her from a lurking danger that neither of them could have ever foreseen?


The Meta Details:
Source: Netgalley
Format: eBook
Length: 200 pages
Publication Date: September 12, 2017
Genre: historical romance
Content Level: adult
Pearl Clutching Content: actresses! (one step up from common strumpets, is what they are)
Trigger Warnings: rape
Featuring: Clark Kent if he was a wallflower in Regency era England, a jilted bridegroom, far too many dukes. Some of them are going to have to leave…


Scorecard:
Recommended for: fans of historicals or someone looking to get into historicals
Rating:

(it’s a gif heavy review, FYI)


Ginny Lurcock’s Thoughts: Me at the beginning of this book: *snotty* I can set aside reality for vampires, dragons, and men who remember to put down the toilet seat every time, but a woman of standing being an actress and no one noticing?

Me at the end of the book: REALLY, WHEN YOU THINK ABOUT IT, WE BELIEVE NO ONE NOTICES CLARK KENT IS JUST SUPERMAN IN A BETTER OUTFIT AND GLASSES. AND HE WORKS WITH LOIS EVERY DAY. IF SHE DIDN’T NOTICE IS IT REALLY THAT SHOCKING THAT SOCIETY DOESN’T MAKE THE CONNECTION BETWEEN ACTRESS AND WALLFLOWER?

and now onto the review…

So as you may have noticed, this book has a premise that should not be believable. I scoffed. I snorted. I rolled my eyes and channeled the douchiest eight-year-old on the planet. (Looking at you, McCallister) But I threw every last one of those complaints away because this book was so good. (that so good should be read in a weird croaky voice.) I loved the pacing, I loved the intrigue, I love that the drama was not hackneyed or cliched. I gasped, squealed, and giggled while generally reacting like a baby (or Ariel) discovering their toes for the first time.

MY GOD LOOK AT THESE THINGS! THEY MOVE.

I hope you appreciate that gif. There are things you see when you google toe wiggling gif that once seen cannot be unseen.

But allow me to be serious for a minute. I thoroughly enjoyed this book. The characters were all well fleshed out and totally believable. I empathized with them and bled for them in turn. They were put in impossible situations time and time again and still managed to overcome everything. The prose was solid. The pacing was great. Never a dull moment without managing to feel rushed. It was unexpected and shocking without being totally out in left field. So while this was the first book I read in the series, I can tell you right now it won’t be the last.

A great historical to kick off the fall reading season.

(Quick note: I was bitchy when I started reading because I’m sick and in pain and generally in a shit mood. This book made me forget that my reproductive system is trying to kill me.)

A complimentary copy of this book was provided in exchange for a fair and honest review via Netgalley.


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